Turkish FM announcement proves wrong those saying President Anastasiades refused a settlement, government says

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Government Spokesman Kyriacos Koushos pointed on Wednesday to an announcement, issued yesterday by the Turkish Foreign Ministry, which said that Ankara never gave its consent for the abolition of guarantees and intervention rights at the 2017 Conference on Cyprus, in the Swiss resort of Crans Montana. According to Koushos, the announcement proves wrong the narrative that is being circulated by some people in Cyprus, claiming that during the Conference at the Swiss resort, Turkey was ready to give up its intervention and guarantee rights and withdraw its troops from Cyprus, and that President Anastasiades refused to solve the Cyprus problem.

Speaking at the Presidential Palace, Koushos was asked to comment on reports in the Cypriot Press, and the Turkish Foreign Ministry announcement, issued on Tuesday.

Moreover, the Government Spokesman pointed to an interview by Jeffrey Feltman, a former UN Under-Secretary-General, who spoke recently to Cypriot daily Politis. According to Koushos, this interview also brings down another narrative, according to which, President Anastasiades left Crans Montana or allowed with his stance the termination of negotiations.

If someone takes into account and evaluates Turkey’s recent behaviour in the broader region, in Syria and Libya, its unlawful activities and military presence in the Cypriot and Greek EEZ, Ankara’s intervention in the Turkish Cypriot community and in the process for the next Turkish Cypriot leader, as well as the attacks against Mustafa Akinci, one may conclude that Turkey should not have a role or a say in Cyprus after a Cyprus settlement, Koushos said.

It is high time to realize in Cyprus that we need to address Turkey’s intransigence and provocations in unison and stop fighting with each other, the Spokesman said, while noting that efforts for a Cyprus settlement should resume from the point they were left off at Crans Montana.

Cyprus has been divided since 1974, when Turkey invaded and occupied its northern third. Repeated rounds of UN-led peace talks have so far failed to yield results. The latest round of negotiations, in July 2017 at the Swiss resort of Crans-Montana ended inconclusively.

Source: Cyprus News Agency

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