Tsipras outlines conditions for a Cyprus settlement

A just and viable solution to the Cyprus problem should encompass the abolition of guarantees, intervention rights by third countries and the withdrawal of occupation troops, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras said on Saturday as he took over the Ministry of Foreign Affairs from Nikos Kotzias who resigned on Wednesday.

Tsipras was sworn in as Greeces Foreign Minister with a civil oath before President of the Hellenic Republic Prokopios Pavlopoulos on Saturday, officially taking over the reins of the Greek diplomacy.

We came very close to a just and viable solution to the Cyprus problem. Kotzias managed to remove the stain hanging over us of non-solution of the Cyprus problem, Tsipras said during the handover ceremony in the Finance Ministry.

A just and viable solution first and foremost means the abolition of guarantees, intervention rights by third countries and of course the withdrawal of occupation troops, highlighting the fact that the Cyprus problem is above all a problem of invasion and occupation, he added.

On his part, Kotzias said during his tenure as Foreign Minister he managed to change the agenda of the Cyprus problem and to put the issue on its real basis, that of invasion and occupation and of the need to abolish the treaty of security and guarantee and the withdrawal of Turkish troops.

Cyprus has been divided since 1974 when Turkey invaded and occupied 37 per cent of its territory. Under the treaty of guarantee, Greece, Turkey and the UK recognise and guarantee the independence, territorial integrity and security of the Republic of Cyprus, and also the state of affairs established by the Basic Articles of its Constitution.

UN-brokered talks ended inconclusively during the Conference on Cyprus in Crans Montana, Switzerland on July 7. The UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres appointed a senior United Nations official, Jane Hall Lute to consult with the parties to the Conference to help determine if the necessary conditions were in place at this stage for a meaningful process, as Guterres noted in his recent report to the Security Council.

After the completion of the first round of consultations with all parties involved, Guterres instructed Lute to hold a new round of discussions with all parties on the way forward, noting that prior to resuming full-fledged negotiations, the sides should agree on terms of reference that would constitute the consensus starting point for a possible negotiated conclusion to the Cyprus issue.

Furthermore, Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades and Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci are scheduled to meet on October 26 with Government Spokesman Prodromos Prodromou noting that the two leaders will exchange views and ideas on how the negotiating progress will proceed forward.

Source: Cyprus News Agency

Tsipras outlines conditions for a Cyprus settlement

A just and viable solution to the Cyprus problem should encompass the abolition of guarantees, intervention rights by third countries and the withdrawal of occupation troops, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras said on Saturday as he took over the Ministry of Foreign Affairs from Nikos Kotzias who resigned on Wednesday.

Tsipras was sworn in as Greeces Foreign Minister with a civil oath before President of the Hellenic Republic Prokopios Pavlopoulos on Saturday, officially taking over the reins of the Greek diplomacy.

We came very close to a just and viable solution to the Cyprus problem. Kotzias managed to remove the stain hanging over us of non-solution of the Cyprus problem, Tsipras said during the handover ceremony in the Finance Ministry.

A just and viable solution first and foremost means the abolition of guarantees, intervention rights by third countries and of course the withdrawal of occupation troops, highlighting the fact that the Cyprus problem is above all a problem of invasion and occupation, he added.

On his part, Kotzias said during his tenure as Foreign Minister he managed to change the agenda of the Cyprus problem and to put the issue on its real basis, that of invasion and occupation and of the need to abolish the treaty of security and guarantee and the withdrawal of Turkish troops.

Cyprus has been divided since 1974 when Turkey invaded and occupied 37 per cent of its territory. Under the treaty of guarantee, Greece, Turkey and the UK recognise and guarantee the independence, territorial integrity and security of the Republic of Cyprus, and also the state of affairs established by the Basic Articles of its Constitution.

UN-brokered talks ended inconclusively during the Conference on Cyprus in Crans Montana, Switzerland on July 7. The UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres appointed a senior United Nations official, Jane Hall Lute to consult with the parties to the Conference to help determine if the necessary conditions were in place at this stage for a meaningful process, as Guterres noted in his recent report to the Security Council.

After the completion of the first round of consultations with all parties involved, Guterres instructed Lute to hold a new round of discussions with all parties on the way forward, noting that prior to resuming full-fledged negotiations, the sides should agree on terms of reference that would constitute the consensus starting point for a possible negotiated conclusion to the Cyprus issue.

Furthermore, Cyprus President Nicos Anastasiades and Turkish Cypriot leader Mustafa Akinci are scheduled to meet on October 26 with Government Spokesman Prodromos Prodromou noting that the two leaders will exchange views and ideas on how the negotiating progress will proceed forward.

Source: Cyprus News Agency